allroutes.to - Berlin, NH Heritage Park Logging History

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Berlin, NH is about a half an hour east of Lancaster. Take route 2 east to route 16 north.


An artist's painting of the inside of a cook house.

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There are several interesting wood carvings on display.

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Working on a log drive, trying to keep the logs from jamming up.

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Felling trees and skidding the logs out.

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Loading pulp wood for the mill. Actually it looks more like they are removing pulp from the sled to put on or beside the ice waiting for the spring log drive.

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Another painting of what a section of the park will look like.

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Inside a bunkhouse.

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Erecting one of the log buildings the lumberjacks ate and slept in.

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Working a log drive.

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Working on a drive. The logs in a row are chained together in a boom to guide moving logs or to hold logs in an area.

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Operating a windlass to move a great amount of wood.

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An early version of a log loader, using a cable operated power shovel.

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Feeding pulp wood down from the big pile to the paper mill.

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One of the past mills in Berlin.

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The Burgess Mill in Berlin.

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Working on cribs.

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These cribs were built on the ice in the river and filled with rocks. Then the surrounding ice was cut so they could sink to the bottom. They were placed in the center of the river to separate logs going to different mills. Men would have to move the logs one way or the other to the right sides. You can still see the remains of them above Berlin.

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Pulling a large rock up.

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A sculpture of log drivers at work. The picture doesn't do it justice, you have to go see it yourself.

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Measuring up a pile of pulp.

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Working the log drive.

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A sculpture of loading pulp.

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Bucking up a log.

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Logs on the drive.

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Logs left high and dry after a jam. The jam dammed up the river, raising the water level. When the jam was broken and the water level dropped these lags were stranded. Now men had to roll them back into the river. Depending on how they laid or jammed into the rocks this could be easy or very hard.

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A windlass beside the river.

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Operating the windlass.

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The logger and his sculptor.

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